Benjamin Hubbard’s Graduation Recital: 4 Years in 2 Hours

Guitarist/composer Benjamin Hubbard presents an evening of original works and arrangements including solo guitar, the soprano/7 string nylon guitar duo Koimé, a Brazilian music group, two-part inventions, a visceral drum/guitar duo, and songs for soprano and chamber ensemble that blur…

Benjamin Hubbard's Graduation Recital: 4 Years in 2 Hours

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Guitarist/composer Benjamin Hubbard presents an evening of original works and arrangements including solo guitar, the soprano/7 string nylon guitar duo Koimé, a Brazilian music group, two-part inventions, a visceral drum/guitar duo, and songs for soprano and chamber ensemble that blur the line between Jazz and Classical.

Listed below are the pieces in the recital, followed by program notes on each piece. Enjoy!

Clothing/Breakfast/Toothbrush

SOLO GUITAR
Etude No. 7

For Difference

ONO MONOPIA
Albino Leopard Fish
‘s Not My Sneeze
Werksah II
Ghostriders in the Sky

CHORO JOGO
Noites Cariocas
Tristeza

Lost Woods

Variations on Donkey Kong Country’s Main Theme


TWO PART INVENTIONS
Chromatic Invention
For Music Box

One to Three for

G Cc bad glAD G’s
Call to Respond

ARRANGEMENTS FOR VOICE
Moon River
Looking Indoors

KOIMÉ
Boss of Blue

Goodbyes Without Words
La Folie from Plateé

Inspiration in Berlin:

The Berlin Philharmonic
Calendar

Shivers from a Sinking Sky
Thousand Eyed Sunset
Similar Trees

Program Notes:

Clothing/Breakfast/Toothbrush
This piece represents the beginning of my time at CalArts. Getting ready for the day, the entire ensemble of musicians does their warm-up on their own. After a minute, I walk around and greet the musicians in a ten second improvisation that is comparable to passing a friend in the hallway.

Carcassi Etude No. 7
The only fully notated piece by another composer to be performed in this recital, it is played in the spirit of my solo noon concert from the first week of school, and the spirit of my first year as a whole. An excellent warm-up, it was important in developing my classical technique.

For Difference
The idea for this piece came to me around age 7. I would mess around with the piece that got me interested in music at a very early age, Für Elise, on the piano. By taking the melody and changing the notes to be very close to each other on the keyboard, I called it the “Minor Version.” Years later, I again played 2 notes very close to each other (a half step apart) and they produced a wobbling rhythm. This inspired a melody, which reminded me of my old rendition of Beethoven’s piece. The rhythms, melodies, phrases, sections, and overall form of this piece are derived from that deeply influential piano piece of my childhood.

Albino Leopard Fish
Most of the riffs from this piece came out of Ono Monopia’s first jam, which took place during a boisterous night in the Main Gallery at CalArts.

‘s Not My Sneeze
Lee Hodel’s infamous sneeze inspired only the title of this piece. The music grew out of a high-energy jam that we countlessly revisited during my first year. Peter Bonoff, my first year roommate developed a deep connection to the piece, and will revisit the elements of a one man show he wrote that were based on this music.

Werksah II
Another year, another first jam of the year, and the beginning of a new piece. The process of creating new music in Ono Monopia generally went like this: jam, listen to recording, refine ideas, jam again, listen to recording… until we don’t need the recording, and the music is in our bones.

Ghostriders in the Sky
This was the first piece of music I ever played in a guitar and drum jam. Early on in high school, I began playing this kind of music. This version is a burst of energy that works as the ending to Werksah II, while looking back to the primal intensity that was the original source of this youthful music.

Noites Cariocas
This is a standard of Choro (Brazilian folk music) repertoire. My interest in this style began with Bossa Nova, led to the purchase of my 7 string nylon guitar, and found a group of others with Clarisse Cast’s (pandero player) initial creation of this ensemble last year. The seven string is the traditional instrument for this music, but tonight, there is a bass player that fills the role of the lowest instrument.

Tristeza
Baden Powell has inspired me more than any other guitarist. Though I can’t say he is my idol in every way, there is more in his playing that I connect to than anybody else’s playing. The Summer that I devoted my practice to nylon guitar, I had a compilation of his music that includes a version of this song. I fell in love with the sound, the rhythmic sensibility, and the message, “sorrow, please go away.”

Link to additional program notes:
https://sites.google.com/site/bjhubb/benjamin-hubbard-program-notes

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